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20111031
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about what can and should be done. we are glad you have joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where wal-mart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and brought to you by the aarp foundation. >> wk kellogg foundation. improving the lives of a vulnerable children. wkkf.org. >> of the annie e. casey foundation, helping build a better future for america's kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: even before the name -- numbers came out, we decided to spend some time getting to know the people behind the pottering -- poverty statistics. cornel west joined us. in tonight's episode, we call this one suffering, we look at what
thomas hearings. she is out with a new book called "reimagining equality." we are glad you can join us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: and the cahill is a professor for social policy, law, and women's studies at brandeis. she was employed at the eeoc. that led to her testimony on the supreme court confirmation hearings of clarence thomas 20 years ago. her newest book is called "reimagining equality, stories of gender, race, and finding home." good to have you back on this program. we were talking before y
"margin call ." we are glad you joined us. coming up, right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: alfredo quinones- hinojosa is a renowned neurosurgeon and director of the pituitary tumor center at johns hopkins. his remarkable path from mexico to the united states is the subject of a new memoir, "becoming dr. q: my journey from migrant farm worker to brain surgeon." an honor to have you on this program. i just want to touch this hand. >> i am honored to be here with you. tavis: it is my delight. let me jump
." hello and thank you for joining us. the police in the united states say people have been killed and one other critically wounded in a shooting at a hair salon in the southeast of los angeles. a man was arrested at a roadblock at about 800 meters from the scene. police say a number of weapons have now been seized. he opened fire at a small shopping center at seal beach, a seaside town in orange county in southern california. we can get the very latest from our correspondent, peter, in los angeles. >> do we know anything more about the person who has -- is believed to have carried out the shooting? gretzky was arrested shortly after the shooting -- >> he was arrested shortly after the shooting, just a few hundred meters away. we do not know the name of the man. it was a white male. but we are hearing reports from eyewitnesses that this may have been a man who was in dispute with his ex-wife, who was at the salon, and they may have been involved in some sort of custody battle. police have a knowledge that their inquiries are focusing on a likely relationship between the alleged gun man and
evening and thanks for joining us. google shares take flight after hours, jumping over $30 a share, susie, after the web giant crushed analyst estimates with its latest earnings. >> susie: tom, profits surged 26% and revenues posted an even bigger gain. here's how the numbers stacked up. google earned $2.7 billion, or $9.72 a share, almost a dollar ahead of analyst's estimates. revenues were also better than expected, up 33% to $7.5 billion. >> tom: joining us with more-- scott kessler. he follows google as senior director of technology research at s&p capital iq. with us tonight in new york. scott, how do you describe these quarterly results from google, blew estimates out of the water. >> yeah, tom, i would say having covered the stock for more than seven years, probably between good and great. google over the years has really delivered time and time again. this quarter was no exception. what was surprising to us was the combination of accelerating revenue growth for the fourth straight quarter as well as continuing improvement in margins reflecting well controlled costs and expenses. t
guy, towards the person who didn't know how to use a computer. i think you don't often see that in other companies. i have covered a lot of these companies. i don't think they really take the care. he really did care. he was a difficult boss at times, people will tell you that. but he had a way of bringing people up to do their best work. people would say yeah, he was difficult but he's a genius. his head designer came up with amazing designs. they worked closely together where, in away, technology takes a backstage to the thing you want to use it for. so people would fall in love with the device. they could make it theirs. >> you think his death marks the end of an era? >> i really do. i have sat and listened to him unvail a product now over a dozen times. and there was something about him. i was at apple the day before he died. they unvailed the iphone 4 s. tim cook got up there. he has a nice way about him, but he's not steve jobs. there was something about the passion that steve had that just came through. i don't think we will see that again, you know. >> tim cook, he
to washington. u.s. officials say the people -- say the plot was conceived and directed from iran. they arrested two men with links to the iranian government. in response, iran embassadors accused the u.s. of politically motivated warmongering. >> the alleged plot was to kill this man, the long serving saudi ambassador to washington. it sounded like fiction, but the polis all too real, said this u.s. official. >> individuals from this country saw to conspire with a drug- craft -- a drug trafficking cartel in another country to assassinate a u.s. official on a -- on u.s. soil. it reads like a script, but it was very real and many lives would have been lost. >> there was no hesitation about who was to blame. senior members of the president's cabinet pointed the finger at iran. >> this was conceived, sponsored, and directed from iran. it flagrantly and violated international law. >> washington was one place the ambassador could have been bombed. the aman -- the man's body was firing a mexican drug cartel to carry out the hit, but he was talking to an fbi investigator. there would have been hundreds
, talking tough on trade to boost the u.s. economy. >> i want to see fair trade policies, and if they're not going to be fair, you cut it off or you tax the hell out of them. >> tom: coming up, our interview with real estate mogul donald trump. it's "nightly business report" for thursday, october 20. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everybody. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by suzanne pratt in new york. it's solid sales for microsoft in the company's most recent quarter. >> suzanne: tom, firms are buying microsoft's office and server software, and that business offset weak consumer demand for p.c.s. microsoft earned 68 cents a share in its fiscal first quarter, in line with wall street forecasts. revenues, however, were a bit better than expected, coming in at $17.3 billion. >> tom: microsoft shares traded slightly lower after-hours, despite the
. the authorities in bosnia say they have arrested radical muslim gunman who opened fire on the u.s. embassy in sarajevo and continued firing for at least 15 minutes. a policeman was seriously wounded in the attack. a gun madge was shot and wounded by police and treated in hospital. intelligence officials say the suspect is serbia citizen linked to the branch of islam known as wahiism. a quake struck southern peru, centered 50 kilometers south of the coastal city devastated by an earthquake four years ago. residents ran from their homes into the streets and power cuts in parts of the city. there are no immediate reports of damage or injuries. the court in morocco sentenced a man to death for the bombing of a tourist cafe in mar acash in april. seven people died in the attack, including eight french nationals. one of the eight accomplices was given a life sentence. others were jailed up to four years. thrinde, devastated large parts of the country, from the capital bangkok. tens of thousands fleeing their home as water levels rise. the government says they can no longer guarantee people's saf
was conceived, sponsored, and directed from iran, according to u.s. officials who announced they had broken up the alleged scheme and arrested two men with links to the iranian government. attorney general eric holder vowed iran would be held accountable. our north america editor mark mardell has the details. >> the alleged plot was to kill this man, the saudi ambassador to washington, high in the councils of the saudi family. the head of the f.b.i. said it sounded like fiction, but the plot was all too real. >> individuals from one country sought to conspire with a drug trafficking cartel in another country to assassinate a foreign official on the united states soil. i know it reads like the pages of a hollywood script. the impact would have been very real, and many lives would have been lost. >> there was no hesitation about who was to blame. the senior member of president obama's cabinet pointed the finger straight at iran. >> this conspiracy was conceived, sponsored, and directed from iran and constitutes a flagrant violation of u.s. and international law. >> this is the saudi embassy in w
's rescue teams. of course, the weather conditions are a challenge for us now. it is minus one degree at the moment in the field. all of the rescue teams are still working. some have been rescued. so we still have a hope, and we are continuing the work. >> did you just say 50,000 people are now in temporary shelters? >> no, not yet, but we have transferred 12,000 shelters, 12,000 family tents, which means 50,000 people will be sheltered tomorrow. the teams are still sending them up. >> ok, i see. and also, can you just respond to some of the accusations that have been made to the bbc that there just is not enough shelter, food is not getting around, there are still many families having to sleep in cars or find shelter where they can? >> that is right. of course, we are trying to give priority to the people who have lost their homes. of course, after the after shock, everybody wants to stay in the tents. even if their houses are not destroyed, because they do not have faith in their houses, which means a huge number of shelter requirements, but we are trying our best, and more than 150
deals, and they're all about boosting u.s. jobs. >> and this jobs bill, mr. speaker, does not require a tax increase. this jobs bill does not require us to go into debt. and this jobs bill has bipartisian support. >> tom: from boosting jobs through trade to losing jobs on wall street, we look at what job cuts in the world of finance could mean for the u.s. economy. it's "nightly business report" for wednesday, october 12. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. high hopes on wall street today. u.s. investors bought up stocks after european officials rolled out what's seen as the most credible plan so far to prop up european banks. tom? >> tom: susie, the plan was rolled out today by the president of the european commission, jose manuel barrosa. he called on european leaders to act quickly and agree at a meeting in two weeks. here's what he's calling for. europea
. >> violence has erupted in sidi bouzid the birthplace of the revolution. police used tear gas to disperse hundreds of protestors. ennahda was the winner of the largest number of seats. our correspondent gave us the latest situation in tunisia. >> we're getting reports as tuesday initiaian -- tunisian police were called to the city sidi bouzid. a party in the election was eliminated. election officials said they were canceling seats won by the popular list party which was led by a local businessman in six electoral districts because of finance violations. this party won many of the votes in sidi bouzid which is why these people came to the streets and is really a reminder of what started this arab spring at the very end of last year with people coming out to the streets to express their dismay. this is a democratic process in action people going to the streets as they were never allowed to do under their former president. an act that was banned under ben alid's regime. thousands of members of the ennahda party banned from people living abroad. some people are saying that the fact that this
money or your life," you choose to hand your money over. >> tom: and back in the u.s., the economy does more than limp along, taking the threat of recession off the table for now. >> the message is that the economy is still recovering. it's a slow growth recovery, it's a bumpy one, but the recovery is ongoing. >> tom: it's "nightly business report" for thursday, october 27. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib remains on assignment. we have good news from both sides of the atlantic ocean today, pushing major stock indices into positive territory for the year. it was a big day of buying for shareholders. the dow rocketed up 339 points to close above 12,000 for the first time since early august. the nasdaq shot up almost 88 points. the s&p 500 rallied more than 42 points. big board volume spiked to just under 1.5 billion sha
>> susie: stocks flirt with new lows for the year on growing concerns about the u.s. and global economies. >> our markets are so fragile, the littlest thing really moves our markets in a negative way. >> tom: from bankruptcy rumors swirling around american airlines to fresh lows for bank of america investors. it's "nightly business report" for monday, october 3. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business port" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. a grisly start to the fourth quarter on wall street. the major averages tumbled today as much as 3%, moving stocks closer to bear market territory, tom. >> tom: susie, investors were startled by news that greece will miss deficit reduction targets it agreed to as part of its bailout deal. concerns about europe continue to impact trading here in the u.s. at the bell, the dow plunged 258 points. the nasdaq lost almost 80 and the s&p fell 32. trading volume starts
to visit damascus suburb of duma. >> and activist gave us this footage showing clashes between troops and protesters. they say it has been going on for months. this is why we asked the government for permission for permissionduma, the first place in damascus to seek protests. this is our second visit. the first visit, our government escorts stopped us from building. syrian official told us the bomb had been found in the center of duma. they wanted us to see the work of what they call armed gangs. >> yesterday, three officers for trying to dismantle a bomb planted here, but unfortunately the bomb was being undetonated from remote, so the man who was trying to dismantle it with his hands has been split into two pieces. >> why would he kill passerby's? hard to answer. >> as the crowd goes, there were more men shadowing us, talking on mobile phones. at times like this, those who don't have a nice thing to say about the government usually do not say anything at all. unexpectedly, one man start speaking. he wants to be heard and seen. he tells us his son was picked up by security forces yes
?c >> and now "bbc world news." >> the ma.ñá described as al the west is killed in a u.s. drone strike inxd yemen.?; theeq$sr(rpq&e1<  jackson mansr trial continues and we hear from the paramedic. final legal arguments are heard welcome toñr "bbc news." broadcasting to america and also aroundÑi the globe.Ñit(Ñi giving up music to concentrate on politics. andñr why theçót( authorities ir hoping that the pet control-free to the french capital. >> president obama hasçó descrid al qaeda's most influential members.jf awlaki has had terror plots. he was killedfá when hisfá conv was attacked by an american drone. our correspondent reports. >> eloquent,fá inexpireational d effective,e1>!á)tt)rw3i]qñ aske attacks americans and he has been killed93aqÑiw3 a u.s. trik hailed byçó washington. and its affiliate will find no safe haven anywhere in the world. working with yemen and our drmed, we will be deliberate, we will be relentless and resolute to destroy terrorist networks that wantxd to kill americans. >> his influence extended far beyond village
live at or below the poverty line, and i will be joined by vicki escarra . we thank you for joining us on night two of the poverty tour. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. one last place to gether with your community. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley, and works to improve financial literacy one question at a time. >> brought to you by the aarp foundation. ♪ >> the w.k. kellogg foundation, improving the lives of vulnerable children. learn more at wkkf.org. ♪ >> helping to build a better future for america's kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. ♪ tavis: in our second part of the poverty tour, we look at the inw pour,or," who used to be the middle class. >> the blues are a personal catastrophe expressed lyrically. >> the white literary blues. >> i teach them in my class. >> the tennessee williams festival. >> me and my wife -- all of us. trying to get here. you have to keep our home. >> the new pouor are the form er middle class. >> i had a job, a family, what people are supposed to have. i have nothin
. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. wall street says good riddance to its most volatile quarter since the financial crisis. susie, things ended on a sour note. >> susie: stocks tumbled today, tom, amid new worries about the global recovery. specifically, the latest disagreements between european leaders over how to resolve that region's debt crisis. at the close, the dow lost more than 240 points. the nasdaq fell 65 and the s&p 500 off 30 points. for the week, the dow had three up days ending up 1%. the nasdaq was down for three days off nearly 3% for the week. and the s&p 500 lost 5% since last week. >> tom: the summer swoon came as u.s. investors worried about europe and u.s. politicians fought over spending. for the quarter, the dow, nasdaq and s&p 500 were all down over 12% during the quarter with the s&p taking the biggest hit off over 14%. september was the 500's fifth straight monthly loss. investors were rewarded by playing defense. utilities stocks performed the best up about a half percent. the second best sector lost more than 4%, consumer
. my colleague tom hudson is on assignment tonight. europe and the u.s. economy-- those troublesome issues pressured stocks today. there were conflicting signals today on how close european leaders are on a deal to solve the debt crisis ahead of a crucial summit this weekend. investors are concerned that talks between france and germany have stalled. and in greece, one of the largest demonstrations as people protested a new batch of austerity measures. the greek parliament takes a final vote on the plan tomorrow. also worrying investors? a pessimistic report on the u.s. economy from the federal reserve. its beige book survey of regional economies showed weaker conditions for growth. all that led to a negative close on wall street. the dow lost 72 points, the nasdaq dropped 53 and the s&p slipped 15. earlier in the day, averages were solidly in positive territory. as suzanne pratt reports, today's volatility is a pattern of trading that will be with us for a while. >> reporter: one day we're up. one day we're down. with the u.s. stock market experiencing such wild movements, it's no
companions in a u.s. air strike. >> this is further proof that al qaeda will find no safe haven anywhere in the world. working with yemen and our other allies and partners, we will be determined, we will be relentless, resolute in our commitment to destroy terrorist networks that aimed to kill americans. >> anwar al-awlaki's influence reached far beyond the village where he was hiding. he used the internet and phone calls to inspire others to attack western targets. the british airways worker from new castle, a convicted of plotting to blow up a plane. anwar al-awlaki was a u.s. citizen. here is 10 years ago praying at a washington mosque. he was considered the then a model cleric, even invited to lunch at the pentagon. >> we are now feeling like things are changing and the of 40's art -- the authorities are putting the muslim community under siege. this is an infringement on civil liberties. the once it will be affected will be the american muslims. >> into a dozen for, anwar al- awlaki -- in 2004, anwar al- awlaki moved to yemen. his group sent bombs described in printer ink cartridges
the mark. alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld joins us with an update. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, october 11. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. a bad start to earnings season-- late today, alcoa posted a skimpy profit that was much lower than expected. the aluminum giant is the first dow component to report and, susie, investors are worried that this a is bad omen for upcoming quarterly results. >> susie: tom, investors were disappointed-- alcoa reported right after the closing bell, and the stock fell more than 3.5% following the earnings release. here's why-- the company earned 15 cents a share in the third quarter, up from a year ago, but seven cents below analysts' estimates. alcoa blamed it on a big drop in aluminum prices and slow economic growth. revenues came in slightly ahead of estimates, up 21% to $6.4 billion. joi
in america starting monday october 10. we will bring you five nights of our travels around the u.s. it is called the poverty tour. all next week will introduce you to the new face of a poor and feature conversations with leaders including kathleen sebelius, jeffrey sachs, a and cornell west among others. we are glad you joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where wal-mart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: when her homeland became torn apart by rebels, she decided to fight back. she cursed and empowered women to fight for peace and a new era of stability in the country. a new memoir about it is ca
. >> this is the main at st. of the city. the ancient capital. now swamped. beyond this point, cars are no use at all. we transfer to a navy patrol boat heading upriver into the flood drenched province. the sailors bought something, a red flags marking the house were a family is stuck. a family with a 2-month-old infant. a lady hands over some milk before moving on. there are more people to reach an aide to be delivered. only smaller but to negotiate the terrain. we make our way along what used to be a side street. helping hands appear over the concrete barrier. it is hard to believe, but out there is actually a main highway. it has completely disappeared underwater. this is the only bit of dry high ground. if we can move in this direction, here are the piles of supplies that the navy has just delivered. unbelievably, there are people that have been living on this bridge for three weeks. they could leave by boat, but they don't want to, preferring to stay close to homes and neighbors. >> it is taken before we get to it. there are still people living over there, i need to find a way to get some of thi
job prospects and heavy debt loads. u.s. student loan debt could top $1 trillion this year, over taking credit card debt. with so much money at stake, the occupy wall street movement is pushing the idea of debt forgiveness for students. darren gersh looks at whether that idea could really boost the economy. >> reporter: kelly mears says his high school counselors and everyone else in the student loan system told him not to worry about the debt he was taking on. >> they told me to dig my grave, essentially, and you know, really. >> reporter: like many of the students in the occupy wall street movement, mears hasn't been able to find a job, and now he and many other protesters are pressing for relief on their student loans. >> i think interest should be forgiven, at the very least. i would like to see student loan debt forgiven, i think it would actually be a huge economic boost. and for our generation-- a whole generation of people it would re-empower them. >> reporter: but analysts say that empowerment would be expensive. >> i'm sure we all feel that we deserve forgiveness. >> r
did. he was almost like a presentation card. when i used to go to studios for auditions, and they said to me, "what have you done," he was the guy, pedro almodovar. he opened the door for me to have access to places i probably would not have. tavis: unpacked this for me. what is happening or not happening in your life for now that makes you want to return to him to break all the rules? >> maybe because i have been working in the united states for 21 years. in a way, i am kind of handicap here to a very strict number of characters that can be offered to me. you had the feeling when i came to this country 21 years ago that i could not speak the language of all. i did "the mambo kings" but speaking a language. i learned the lines unethically. i have an interpreter to understand what i was hearing from my director. in a box, in a way. that allows me to play a specific number of characters with a specific number of directors. i have done a lot of epics, mainly spanish characters, which i absolutely prefer, because i am proud of my heritage and community. but at this point, you want to do so
viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib remains on assignment tonight. some mixed news on the economy today. let's start with the good news. consumers spent more money last month, putting off fears of a recession. spending increased six tenths of a percent, that's three times what was spent in august. americans bought big ticket items like cars and computers. but, there is a flip side. and as darren gersh reports, consumers are spending faster than they save and faster than they earn. >> reporter: if americans have learned anything in the last few years, saving less and spending more is not a recipe for long run economic health, but that's what consumers were doing last month. >> wages are stagnant. people are not getting raises, people are not getting bonuses. so what's happening is that the average consumer is having to dip into her or his savings in order to keep food on the table, in order to pay mortgages, in order to pay their bills, in order to buy gasoline et cetera, and that is not sustainable. >> rep
the u.s. as well. so the stakes are very high here. >> suzanne: from europe to earnings, it's a golden quarter for the golden arches and a few other big firms. what the results may suggest about the economy.. it's "nightly business report" for friday, october 21. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everybody. susie gharib is on assignment tonight. i'm joined by suzanne pratt. suzanne, earnings and europe battled for investors attention today. stocks rallied as optimism grew ahead of this weekend's summit of european leaders. tom, several big blue chip firms reported solid results. we'll get to those numbers in a moment. but first, the market: the dow rose 267 points, the nasdaq added almost 39 and the s&p tacked on 23. trading volume, the heaviest this week. 1.1 billion shares on the big board. 2.1 billion on the nasdaq. today's big rally helped the blue chip
zealand. joining us now, our correspondent duncan kennedy. the new zealand government is currently ins investigating this indent. what have they revealed so farsome >> so far as the two investigations going on, we don't know very much. they are, of course, in their early stages. we can't get access to find out exactly what happened. all sorts of suggestions. all sorts of rumors during the rounds about whether the boat had proper charts, all that kind of thing. really the effort so far is on to the operation itself to get the oil off the arena, and also to clear up on the beaches. this is an operation in trouble on all fronts. you've just heard there from mr. henderson, the amount of oil that's leaked up. we thought it was 20 or 30 tons. now they're talking about 350 tons of oil leaking into the bay. they've had to suspend that pumping operation to get the remaining oil off because of the bad weather. the 36-man salvage crew onboard had to be taken off. they issued a may day call because they were fearful of what was happening. on the shore, the extent of the oil that's washing up has g
, people use these gadgets every day. not only in california, but around the world. look at the internet right now. a lot of people are tweaking the the very familiar apple symbol. if you look at the website, it is then replaced with the word steve jobs. it is a black-and-white photograph of steve jobs. he is someone who has affected so many people around the world. not everyone realizes how much this man has affected them. he has been a hugely influential figure. not only in electronics, but everyday life for some many people. >> thank you. joining me now from new york is our correspondent, looking at the business aspects of this. steve jobs was apple. can apple logo on without him -- pineapple go on without him? >> there has been a lot of speculation for a long time about whether you could separate apple the company from steve jobs. he was so much behind the innovation, the countless innovation over the years. i suspect when its shares began trading in apple again, when people live that a chance to digest the news, we may see a slight fall and the share price on the initial reaction. w
. beyond this point, cars are now used at all. we transferred to a navy patrol boat heading deeper into the flood drenched province. the sailors bought something, a red flag marking a house where a family is stuck. a family with a 2-month-old infant. the lady hands over some milk before moving on. there are more people to reach and more aid to be delivered. we make our way along what used to be a side street, heading for road a breach. healthy hands appear over the concrete barrier. it is hard to believe, but out there is a major highway. this bridge is the only bit of dry high ground. if we just move up in this direction, here are the piles of supplies that the navy has just delivered. unbelievably, there are people that have been living on this bridge for three weeks. >> they could leave by boat, but they don't want to. >> it is taken before we get to it. there are still people living over there, so i have to find a way to get some of the food to them. >> these people are living on the upper floors of the partially submerged homes. others have decided to move to safety, but they
. >> we are used to hearing about gun crime in california over the past decade. buddy -- but seal beach is a new name to many of us. >> it is. that is because it is one of those many relatively quiet communities along the beautiful coast of california. it is really off the beaten track a little bit. it is not any where the tourists go to. it is not that close to los angeles. it is not that close to the theme parks. there is a very large elderly community there. it is otherwise left alone. it is a beautiful sleepy sort of place. it is really not on the map. that is probably why people who live there like it, because it is so quiet and tranquil. >> do we have an idea of how things stand out and the narrative -- helping japan -- and thegs anpanned out narrative? >> it happened at a salon at a small mall, a small strip mall. they found nine people who had been shot, six of them initially declared dead. three were taken to hospital. two of those three people lost their battle for lac, leaving just one person in hospital who -- battle for life, leaving just one person in hospital. >> and nige
journalists have been able to get into syria. >> it is a suburb of damascus. an activist gave us this footage, crosses between troops and protesters. they said this has been going on for months. we cannot do anything here. >> i am terribly sorry. >> this is why we ask the government for permission to visit. this is our second visit. the first visit, our government escorts stop us from filming. syrian officials told us a bomb had been found in the center. they wanted us to see the worst of what they called armed gangs. >> around 1:15 yesterday, three officers were trying to dismantle a bomb planted here. unfortunately, it was detonated by a remote. his companion -- >> why would kill passersby if they did not destroy the tree? as the crowd grows, there were more men listening in. at times like this, if you do not have anything to say it nicely about the government, you do not say anything at all. he wants to be heard and seen. he tells us his son was picked up by security forces yesterday. >> what was your son doing? was he protesting? >> we were leaving the mosque, he said. it was a demonstrat
. why this enormous income gap? one major reason is that u.s. workers without a college education cannot compete with the chinese, the indian, or other workers around the world that better educated and cheaper. question, is it a fallacy that the rich just get richer? pat buchanan? >> no, john. what happened to the american economy is dramatic historic transfer from manufacturing and production power to a financial capital where people buy and sell and trade paper. second thing happened is this, we dropped the u.s. economy, we had the highest wages in the world, and strict regulations into a global economy with countries with the lowest wages you can imagine, and no regulation, so production and manufacturing in all those jobs left the united states and went to china, asia, other countries around the world. that's why the middle-class, blue collar workers have had have arrested in coming for 30 years, because we've done that to the american people, john. and take the first decade of the 20th century. we lost 6 million manufacturing jobs, one in every three we had. and 55,000 factories. th
, jeffrey sachs. we are glad you joined us tonight for part for our party tore here on pbs, coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> brought to you by the aarp foundation. w. k. kellogg foundation, engaging communities to improve the lives of local children. learn more at wkkf.org. >> the annie e. casey foundation, helping to build better future for american kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: despite all the talk in washington from both sides of the aisle, democrats and republicans, about the importance of jobs,
're glad you have joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by viewers like you. if thank you. kcet public television] tavis: pleased to welcome martin sheen and emilio west of as to the program. the way, a movie written and directed by emilio, here are some scenes from "the way." >> are they going to change your life? >> something like that. ♪ >> i am so sorry, i had no idea. >> those are smart, confident, stubborn. >> a lot like you. tavis: take me back when you started writing the project and you know you are writing this specifically for your father. what is that process like? >> i wanted to write something that explored who he is a
you to keep yourself safe while volunteering in the clean-up? >> they are telling us to not clean up because it might damage the beach. i am not too sure about that. they're telling us to wear gloves and not getty oil understand. -- and to not get any oil on our skin. >> i guess you'll have to leave it there. she lives in a house next to the beach. flooding in thailand is been described as the worst in decades. the prime minister calling it a national crisis. i least 260 people have been killed and heavy rain is continuing to fall. the authorities are racing to build sand bags in the capital city to prevent flooding there. one of the worst affected areas is about 100 kilometers north of bangkok. please tell us how bad the flooding is. >> it is very bad, indeed. a lot of this area, you can not get around in a motorized vehicle at all. i've just seen an inflatable dinghies on the back of a trailer heading in that direction. that is where the worst of the flooding is. there's a point after which cars, motorbikes are no good at all. army trucks are the only way of getting around. the aut
in -- a new interim government. >> of libya used to have a lot of rules. it was a police state. for the young fighters letting off steam in the old compound, they must feel that there aren't any now. they have beaten the dictator they have brought up to fear. but building a new country will take rules, discipline, and security. the compound is guarded by fighters that say proudly that they are from a rebel town and have armed militias. if they don't expands, it is a recipe for a failed state. they're forming a national security force. they believe their town led the fight, a domestic together during the tough times that are inevitable? no one wants to think too hard about that yet. this city has barely started the honeymoon. if anyone is morning the colonel in the ruins of his compound, they are keeping quiet about it. >> double. gaddafi double, criminal. >> and the future for libya? gosh freedom libya. a freedom libya. >> and freedom means the national transitional council keeping the promise to hold elections within two years. yet another march was held in the square today, remembering the
as the imf warns of possible return to recession. thousands protesting in new york and across the u.s. in mounting anger over the financial crisis. >> it is 2:00 a.m. in london, broadcasting to viewers on pbs in america in and around the world. the co-founder of apple, steve jobs, has died at the age of 56. he was one of the world's best known business leaders, credited with transforming digital technology with the apple mac personal computer, ipod, ipad, and iphone. mr. jobs fought a long battle with cancer and stepped down in august because of health problems. we look back at his life. >> we are going to make history together today. >> january, 2007. a classic steve jobs performance. a simple product launch by a man with charisma rare in the tech world. >> good morning. how can i help you? >> i would like to order 4000 lot ks to go. >> it was not just a phone. it was the latest product of a company which showed good design was essential for good computing. the apple story started as an amateur computer club, where steve jobs' next the bosnia -- jobs met steve wozniack. the apple to
. a moderate islamist party claims of victory in tunisia's first elections since the arab spring began. >> u.s. diplomats hold exploratory talks with north korea, starting negotiations on nuclear disarmament. encounter, andse she meets the victims of brisbane's floodsin of australia. >> it is 4:00 a.m. in london. protesting to viewers on pbs in america and in london and around the world. this is "newsday." >> rescue teams in turkey are continuing to search for survivors after the strong earthquake that hit the east of the country on sunday. least 270 people have been killed and it is feared the death toll will rise. more than 1000 have been injured, in the earthquake which measured 7.2 and stuck close to the border with iran. this city was the worst hit, with 1000 building destroyed. from there, daniel sanford sent this report. >> hammering, clawing, cutting, pulling at the ruins of reinforced concrete apartment blocks. the ordinary people of this city are desperately helping the official rescue teams to look for the hundreds who are missing. at the center of this rescue effort, is a 29-year-o
with the friends of amanda knox group. we spoke to you a short time ago. just remind us of your reaction. >> it is very heartwarming. you can tell the relief on her face and in her words. she is just overwhelmed. rightly so. >> and what you think the family will be doing now? what you think it will be thinking? what would you think their main focus will be? >> when you have been gone for four years, the assimilation back into her life is going to be very difficult. but a man that is amazingly effervescent and resilient. she always has been a. she is a very kind and she will, surely i imagine, the enrolled in the university of washington to complete her degree. if she should have graduated in 2009, but that did not happen, unfortunately. >> she has had lots of support in her home city. she has also had a lot of support from the media in the united states. that has not been the case in other parts of the world. i understand the people you represent have received some hate mail throughout the years that you were campaigning for amanda's release. how will you cope with opinions that will sti
the euro-zone will use its $610 billion bailout fund. and how to ensure the stability of european banks. the top priority is planning for a structured debt default by greece. >> i think the best we can hope for at this point is that europeans reassure markets that greece will be allowed to default in an orderly way and the greek default will not affect italy, because the european leaders will, as a second important step, take steps to backstop and support the italian government bond market. >> tom: stocks moved higher as european leaders worked towards a debt resolution. the dow rose 162 points, the nasdaq added 12 and the s&p 500 up nearly 13 points. big board volume continues above one billion shares while nasdaq volume climbed above two billion. sales of new homes were up last month following four straight monthly declines. the commerce department says sales jumped nearly 6% as builders lowered prices in a soft market. separately, another report shows companies ordered more heavy machinery and computers in september. overall demand slipped by just under 1%, but that was largely becau
sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. the u.s. job market is perking up: american businesses added more than 100,000 jobs in september. tom, that was much better than feared given all the talk about recession. >> tom: but susie, it's still going to take more than that to power up the stalled u.s. economy. the labor department said payrolls grew by 103,000 and the unemployment rate is still stuck at 9.1%. it turns out this summer may not have been quite so bad for jobs are originally thought. the government now says 57,000 jobs were created in august. zero was reported previously. >> susie: as good as all that sounds. some experts say it's not enough to keep the u.s. out of recession. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 103,000 new jobs in one month is an okay number. but, it falls way short for the millions of unemployed. sure several industries hired people in september, including retail, construction and health care. the problem is the economy needs to add more like a quarter million new jobs a month for many months, before the unemployment rate can fall sharply. economist
're glad you have joined us. "new york times" excessive editor and olympian john carlos coming up right now. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. kcet public television] tavis: a few quick programming notes. first tonight, some terrific conversations coming up tonight and all this week. tomorrow night nile rogers is here. a conversation with anita hill. hard to believe it has been 20 years since the scandal that propelled her into the public eye and jerry west on thursday and friday jackie collins. tonight, though, we are pleased to kick off this week with jill abramson. las
million people in the united states do not have a job. u.s. unemployment is now a national crisis. federal reserve board chairman bernanke sees the current unemployment crisis as widespread, enduring and unprecedented. >> we've had now close to 10% unemployment now for a number of years, and of the people who are unemployed, about 45% have been unemployed for six months or more. >> that 45% figure adds up to roughly six million americans them have not had a job in the past six months. mr. bernanke also says long- term unemployed could well become the permanently unemployed. the bernanke comments come in the middle of a nationwide protest movement called occupy wall street. these protestors are demonstrating against wall street and its corporations. , who they believe caused the ongoing unemployment crisis. boston, baltimore, chicago, denver, kansas city, los angeles, new york, san francisco, seattle, st. louis, washington, d.c. have all seen the wall street demonstrations. president obama's former green energy advisor, ben jones, compares the protests to the arab spring. >> i think there's
situation. "we're getting reports as the police are using tear gas to disperse hundreds of people who are protesting in sidi bouzid. the reason they are on the streets is because a party in the election was eliminated in that town. election officials said that they were canceling seats won by a popular party because of campaign finance violations. this party won many of the votes which is why these people have come into the streets. it is and reminder of what started off this whole arab spring which began at the very end of last year with people coming out on to the streets to express their dismay. this is a democratic process in action. this was banned under the president's regime for more than two decades and a leader was in exile in london for much of that time. thousands were banned from tunisia. some people have said perhaps the fact that the party is now back in the country is the reason that they voted for them. other people are a little bit more concerned. the leader has absolutely said that there will be no change to the direction of the country. there will not be sure real l
years ago, suffering from cancer. there really is widely criticized, especially in the u.s. many doubted if he was the real bomber. today, he looks very different. a sick and frail man. he spoke from his home in tripoli. >> the truth will become clear one day. in a few months from now, it will be announced. >> libya's new government has promised to seek out new suspects. he feels he has earned the right to die in peace. >> i am a simple person, more simple than you could imagine. please leave me alone. i only have a few more days, months left. i want to die in my house with my family. >> his hope that libya would become a united country with no more fighting. >> i am in singapore. >> the headlines this hour. amanda knox and her former boyfriend raffaele sollecito have been cleared on murdering the british student meredith kercher. >> both of them have now been released from prison. she is expected to leave the country in the next 24 hours. the afghan president karzai said that he is no longer prepared to hold direct talks with the taliban aimed at ending the conflict there. the taliban a
works gives us data about how to build better vaccines and a tool to combine with the spraying, the mosquito killing, all of these interventions that will bring the number of steps down. >> bed nets and insecticides remain vital in the fight against malaria. the vaccine is no magic bullet. but even the jab that was 50% effective could save huge numbers of lives in the years to come. theeurope's highest -- judgment comes in a case that could have major implications for medicine. scientists say the decision by the court of justice may impede european research into the use of stem cell therapy or dry research overseas. a car bomb exploded outside the foreign ministry in the somali capital, killing four people, including the suicide bomber. the attack came as kenya's defense and foreign minister are holding talks nearby. kenya sent troops to somalia on friday. china's ruling communist party-- the last meeting of the party's central committee before new leadership is chosen next year calls for a push to energize state-owned media. to the libyan capital of tripoli where hillary clint
% in alternative investments. joining us now with more analysis? charles reinhard, deputy chief investment officer at morgan stanley. hi, charlie, nice to you have on the program. >> thank you, happy columbus day. >> susie: same to you. so tell me, what change. why the asset allocation switch now? >> well, we think in the last several weeks the risk and the uncertainty have gone up. and we wanted to be in harmony with what we saw could be a bumpier road ahead. and that's why we increased the waiting to save haven assets and we lowered the weighting to different riskier assets. >> susie: so let's talk about the safe haven. you are identifying them as things like cash, investment grade bonds, short-term debt instruments. but not gold. so tell us what your definition of a safe haven is these days. >> well, you named it. these are actually different investments that when we hit bumpy times having a higher exposure to them can make the bumps feel smaller than they otherwise might be. and we felt it was prudent to increase our exposure to items like you just ticked off. cash, high quality bonds and so f
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